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How Computational Epitope Mapping Identifies the Interactions between Nanoparticles Derived from Papaya Mosaic Virus Capsid Proteins and Immune System

[ Vol. 20 , Issue. 3 ]

Author(s):

Mahbobeh Zamani-Babgohari, Kathleen L. Hefferon*, Tsu Huang and Mounir G. AbouHaidar   Pages 214 - 225 ( 12 )

Abstract:


Background: Nanoparticles derived from plant viruses possess fascinating structures, versatile functions and safe properties, rendering them valuable for a variety of applications. Papaya mosaic Virus-Like Particles (VLPs) are nanoparticles that contain a repetitive number of virus capsid proteins (PMV-CP) and are considered to be promising platforms for vaccine design. Previous studies have reported the antigenicity of PMV nanoparticles in mammalian systems.

Materials and Methods: As experiments that concern vaccine development require careful design and can be time consuming, computational experiments are of particular importance. Therefore, prior to expressing PMV-CP in E. coli and producing nanoparticles, we performed an in silico analysis of the virus particles using software programs based on a series of sophisticated algorithms and modeling networks as useful tools for vaccine design. A computational study of PMV-CP in the context of the immune system reaction allowed us to clarify particle structure and other unknown features prior to their introduction in vitro.

Results: The results illustrated that the produced nanoparticles can trigger an immune response in the absence of fusion with any foreign antigen.

Conclusion: Based on the in silico analyses, the empty capsid protein was determined to be recognised by different B and T cells, as well as cells which carry MHC epitopes.

Keywords:

PMV-CP, virus nanoparticles, antigenic epitopes, immune response, vaccine design, in silico analysis.

Affiliation:

Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, ON, Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, ON, Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, ON, Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, ON

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